Month: July 2019

‘Beautiful Boy’: A true story of addiction and hope

Looking for your teenage son on the streets when he doesn’t come home can be an excruciating experience. It’s a recurring one for David Sheff (Steve Carell). His son, Nic Sheff (Timothée Chalamet), tends to disappear when he is high.   The movie “Beautiful Boy” is the story of father and son, David and Nic Sheff, and their ongoing battle with Nic’s drug dependency. The script is based on two memoirs: “Beautiful Boy,” by David Sheff and “Tweak,” by Nic Sheff.   The movie tries to blend two perspectives of addiction: one from a father who is constantly trying to help his addicted son and the other from the son, who tries to stay sober only to relapse. The story is a reminder that when someone is addicted to a substance it affects their entire family.   From the first scene, David is trying to help Nic, who is doing crystal meth. He wants to know more about his son’s drug addiction, in an attempt to help him. We go back to the previous year …

‘A Star is Born’: A Heartfelt Remake

Fame, talent and love are at the heart of the new reincarnation of “A Star is Born.” The film marks Bradley Cooper’s impressive directorial debut. He also co-wrote the screenplay, composed original songs for the film and produced it. His female counterpart is the pop superstar Lady Gaga. She fills in the shoes of previous divas who took on the role: Judy Garland in 1954 and Barbra Streisand in 1976. The story has been told previously in three movies but this version feels particularly personal and grand. The movie follows the love story between Jackson Maine (Bradley Cooper) and Ally (Lady Gaga). They meet in a drag queen bar where she is the only performer singing live. Ally sings a cover of “La Vie en Rose.” Jackson is mesmerized by her performance and meets her backstage. While he is waiting for her, he sings to an audience of a few drag queens. Ally watches him from afar and an instant connection is made through their love of music. They go out into the night, get …

“The Tale” opens dialogue about sexual abuse for BU community

Audience at Boston University College of Communication before a screening of “The Tale” on Friday, November 9, 2018. / Photo by Mariana Sánchez    BOSTON, November 10, 2018 – “This film was created to start a dialogue,” Jennifer Fox said before screening her movie “The Tale” at Boston University last night as part of the series Cinemathèque. The film, directed by Fox, is a fictionalized version of the sexual abuse she experienced at 13.   “People need to know that it happens, it’s real, and that woman just don’t imagine it”, Gerald Peary, curator of Cinemathèque, said on why he programmed the movie. Cinemathèque is a series of film screenings and conversations with their creators organized by the Department of Film and Television at BU opened to the general public.   “The Tale” narrates the story of how Fox, played by Laura Dern, in her forties reframed what she used to call her first relationship. Mrs. G (Elizabeth Debicki), her riding coach, groomed her into a relationship with Bill (Jason Ritter) a middle-aged former athlete …

‘All About Nina’: the movie that echoes a movement

“All About Nina,” featured in the Spotlight Screening at the Boston Women’s Film Festival at the Brattle Theater in Cambridge during the last week of September, is the dramedy that reiterates the current #MeToo climate. The festival’s main goal is to highlight female-centric stories directed by women. This year, it offered 16 films made in 2017 and 2018 from China, New Zealand, Indonesia and the U.S. with two venues at the Boston Museum of Modern Arts and The Brattle Theatre. They also added two previously released films to the festival’s schedule. “All About Nina” tells the story of stand-up comedian Nina Geld, played by Mary Elizabeth Winstead. Nina writes her set around her own bad decisions and performs it with coarse jokes. The director, Eva Vives, who also wrote the screenplay, based Nina’s struggles on her own life experience. Vives was not a stand-up comedian, but she was a regular audience member in New York stand-up shows when she was younger. She has previously said that attending these shows helped her come to grips to what happened to …

‘Blaze’: The Forgotten Troubadour

Country music’s best kept secret might just be Blaze Foley. The singer-songwriter who died at 39 from a gunshot wound in 1989 is the topic of Ethan Hawke’s latest directorial cinematic work, Blaze. The movie is based on Blaze’s partner and muse Sybil Rosen’s memoir “Living in the Woods in a Tree: Remembering Blaze Foley.” Hawke and Rosen co-wrote the screenplay. The movie diverges from the usual chronological structure of a biopic. Hawke took a chance in showing specific periods of Foley’s life that let the audience see a complex character. The narrative is divided in the past when Rosen, played by Alia Shawkat, and Foley, interpreted by newcomer Ben Dickey, lived in a tree house. The warm colors and idyllic montages show a dreamer in the cusp of looking for something bigger. When Blaze and Sybil leave their home to look for better opportunities, Blaze says to Sybil, “I don’t want to be a star, I want to be a legend.” The movie goes back and forth with Blaze’s performing his repertoire to an indifferent …

“One size fits all treatment doesn’t work,” said addiction specialist at HUBweek

Dr. Martha Kane from Mass General Hospital and Dr. Scott Hadland from Boston Medical Center discuss addiction treatment and recovery for young adults in the Ideas Dome at HUBweek on Wednesday, Oct. 10, 2018, in Boston, Mass. Photo credit: Mariana Sánchez Gaona   BOSTON, October 13, 2018 – “We now understand that addiction is a chronic relapsing disease”, said Dr. Martha Kane at a HUBweek event about addiction treatment and recovery for young adults. Dr. Kane, the clinical director of the Addiction Services Unit at Massachusetts General Hospital, added, “everyone needs an individualized treatment plan.”   Dr. Scott Hadland, the second panelist, is a pediatrician and addiction specialist at Boston Medical Center. The two panelists discussed how they approached addiction in young adults with comprehensive treatments. Young adults are people between the ages of 18 to 25.   According to the 2014 national survey conducted by the Substance Abuse and Mental Health Services Administration, “more than 1 in 5 young adults aged 18 to 25 were current users of illicit drugs in 2014.” The Boston …