All posts tagged: art

Coraline

Coraline is an unexpected, different and utterly beautiful, stop-motion animated movie. It’s based on the book with the same name written by Neil Gaiman. Henry Selick, who directed “The Nightmare Before Christmas,” headed this movie. Selick creates a magical world, which not only Coraline wants to get lost in but anyone who gets a peek will do too. The unlikely road of Coraline to the big screen starts with the book it’s based on. Coraline is a children’s book that many have found a bit disturbing. The story gets darker and more adventurous as you go along. It might be because it’s not all yellow brick roads or chocolate factories. Maybe is the lack of adult supervision that 80s kids enjoyed, or the other mother’s macabre plan. Neil Gaiman always thought of Coraline as a kids’ story, which he wrote for her daughters. However, his literary agent, Merrilee Heifetz, thought the book was too scary for kids. Gaiman suggested that she should read it to her daughters, aged eight and six at the time, and …

When She Writes

I’m an avid reader but it was only when someone asked me which female authors were my favorites, I realized that I couldn’t even name five. There’s a difference when you are a woman and you read something written by a woman rather than a man, especially a memoir. The four books that I mention here are about the different life experiences of four women. However, the most notorious thing they have in common, other than being female, is that they are makers. “Furiously Happy” by Jenny Lawson could be sum up by the rest of its title: ‘A funny book about horrible things.’ The book starts with the usual “advance praise” quotes from Dickens, Hemingway, Dostoyevsky and Ms. Lawson’s shrink, you’ll know it’s not the usual memoir right from the start. In these stories, Ms. Lawson describes her day-to-day struggles with mental illness. She also discusses her love for taxidermied animals and how sometimes they like to ride her cat. She shares laugh out loud stories about her depression, anxiety, self-harm, her shrinks, her …

Big Magic

“Big Magic” by Elizabeth Gilbert could be considered a self-help book. She even acknowledges it in a few chapters. However, this book is about the creative process. It’s a book for every creative person that has doubted themselves or anyone who needs a “legitimacy pass” to pursue their heart’s desire, it’s even for the people that don’t consider themselves to be creative. This book is an encouragement to live a creative life. It touches on several myths about creativity and a creative personality, which might be revered by some. Like the writers that transform their demons into their muse or the artists that suffer while creating art. This book demystifies the almost romantic idea of justifying your shitty mess of a life in order to create. You don’t need to live in an abyss of suffering to make art. You’ll create in spite of it. “Big Magic” is divided into six chapters that might read as steps. It starts with Courage, continues with Enchantment, Permission, Persistence, Trust, and Divinity. The book lays a path and the …

Big Eyes

La película “Big Eyes” del director Tim Burton cuenta la historia de Margaret Keane. Artista estadounidense conocida por pintar ojos grandes en los sujetos de sus obras, principalmente niños. Pero antes de que Margaret fuera conocida por las pinturas de “big eyes”, su esposo Walter Keane era quien se llevaba el crédito. La película inicia cuando Walter y Margaret se conocen y se centra en cómo su obra llegó a ser un éxito de consumo masivo. El personaje de Walter Keane, interpretado por Christoph Waltz, es quien sobresale con su personalidad extrovertida y su artística manipulación para engañar a todos incluyendo a si mismo. Mientras que el personaje de Margaret Keane, interpretado por Amy Adams, vive pintando día y noche para poder mantener la demanda de sus pinturas creada por su esposo. Él la convence de que sus pinturas no serán compradas sí saben que el arte es hecho por una mujer. Además él es mejor para venderlas que ella. Ambos son cómplices de un fraude del que les fue difícil desprenderse. Él nunca admite …

Cuídese mucho

El mes anterior visité dos exposiciones en el Museo Tamayo, que en ese momento gozaba de una popularidad inesperada gracias a el furor ocasionado por la exposición “Obsesión Infinita” de Yayoi Kusama. Miles de personas hacían una fila interminable afuera del museo, iba desde su entrada y se perdía entre los árboles.A pesar de la sorprendente obra de Kusama, la segunda exposición que visité me llamó más la atención. La sala donde se exponía era de muros blancos altísimos iluminados naturalmente, en las paredes se desplegaban fotografías de mujeres leyendo una hoja. Había televisiones con actrices y cantantes, y en el centro una mesa con más fotografías. Todas estaban leyendo e interpretando una carta que Sophie Calle les hizo llegar.